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Cougar Pics In N.s.


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#101 Markus

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Posted 16 July 2010 - 07:18 PM

True trapper...but not everyone puts a camera on bait. A lot of guys mount them on deer trails and I'd think a predetor like a cougar may hunt near such trails.
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#102 Trapper

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Posted 16 July 2010 - 07:26 PM

Good point Markus.
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#103 KPR

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 12:00 AM

The cougar is considered a "non predator" and will only eat food that it kills.



Ummm I hate to be picky but...
From Websters...

Main Entry: pred·a·tor
Pronunciation: \ˈpre-də-tər, -ˌtȯr\
Function: noun
Date: 1912

1 : one that preys, destroys, or devours
2 : an animal that lives by predation


Main Entry: pre·da·tion
Pronunciation: \pri-ˈdā-shən\
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English predacion, from Latin praedation-, praedatio, from praedari
Date: 15th century

1 : the act of preying or plundering : depredation
2 : a mode of life in which food is primarily obtained by the killing and consuming of animals

Cougars are predators and that is the plainest most obvious evidence they are NOT in Nova Scotia.
There has never been a comfirmed cougar kill found here...or New Brunswick for that matter.
Now maybe they came from PEI orrrr maybe across the ice from The Rock but another point against them is that if they aren't in NB...they ain't here!!
Maybe the Pony's ran em off Sable?


"Cougar Predation - Description
Cougars attempt to stalk their prey and attack from cover. They frequently kill sheep and goats by biting the top of the neck or head. Broken necks are common in these kills. This differs from the typical coyote bite in the throat and general mutilation caused by dogs. However, cougars also may kill sheep and goats by biting the throat. This may result from prey falling or being knocked down and caught, or it may simply be the method found effective by individual cougars and most convenient on some prey animals. Cougars may kill by grasping the head of prey such as sheep, goats and deer and pulling the head until the neck is broken. Many of these may not have been bitten but die quickly. Cougars kill calves much like they do sheep and goats. Multiple kills of sheep and goats by cougars are common; cases of a hundred or more animals killed in a single incident have been recorded. As a rule, very few animals, often only one or two in such incidents, are fed upon by the cougar.

Cougars usually kill larger animals, such as deer, elk, horses and cattle, by leaping on their shoulders or back and biting the neck. Claw marks on the neck, back and shoulders are characteristic of these kills. The prey animal's neck may be broken by bites or by the animal failing from the attack. There may also be bites in the throat of these larger prey. The size of the canine tooth punctures and the type of bone damage help distinguish cougar kills from those made by coyotes, dogs and foxes. An adult cougar's upper canine teeth are approximately 1 1/2 to 2 1/4 inches apart; the lower teeth are approximately 3/8 to 1/2 inch closer together. A cougar's teeth are massive compared to those of the average coyote or bobcat.

Except when prey is scarce, cougars do not normally feed on carrion other than their own kills or possibly those taken away from other predators. They usually carry or drag their kills to a secluded area under cover to feed and drag marks are frequently found at fresh kill sites. Cougars generally begin feeding on the viscera (liver, heart, lungs, etc.) through the abdomen or thorax but like other carnivores, individuals differ. Some begin feeding on the neck or shoulder while others prefer the hindquarters. Like other cats, cougars normally leave relatively clean-cut edges when they feed compared to the ragged edges of tissue and bone left by coyotes. They also may break large bones in feeding on domestic and wild animals.

Cougars frequently try to cover their kills with soil, vegetation (leaves, grass, limbs) or snow. They may eviscerate prey and cover the viscera separately from the rest of the carcass. Even where little debris is available, bits of soil, rock, grass or sticks may be found on the carcass. However, where multiple kills are made at one time, there may be no effort to cover more than one or two of them.

Cougar "scrapes" or "scratches", composed of mounds of soil, grass, leaves, or snow, are probably a means of communication with other cougars. These scrapes are generally 6 to 8 inches high and urine is deposited on the mounds. Male cougars appear to make scrapes as territorial markers around their kills and near trails and deposit urine and feces on them; these markers may be considerably larger than others, up to 2 feet long, 12 inches wide and 6 to 8 inches high in some cases.

Cougar tracks are relatively round and rarely show any claw marks since the claws are normally retracted. Tracks of large adult males' front feet may be 4 inches or more long and about the same or slightly less in width. The hind tracks are slightly smaller. The rear pads of the feet are distinctively different from those of other carnivores. Typically, there are two lobes in front and three on the rear of the rear pads although there are individual variations. With extensive experience, some hunters can recognize individual cougars by their tracks, even without distinctive features such as missing toes or other deformities. "
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#104 Bob LeBlanc

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 06:02 AM

The cougar is considered a "non predator" and will only eat food that it kills.


I think Trapper meant to say "non scavenger"... ;)

Bob :)
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#105 Ian

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 06:24 AM

Now maybe they came from PEI


Whaaauuutt??

Theres cougars on the Island??
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#106 wammer

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 06:27 AM

During the 2 weeks this "alleged cougar" was in the area, a local man set up a couple trail cams trying to get a picture but to no avail. I guarantee that if it comes back someone will get a better pic. The picture taker says the DNR guys said based on the pic and paw print and what she described that she saw, theres an 80 percent chance its a cougar. Also keep in mind that she described a long tail that was wrapped around the animal when its picture was taken. That would rule out a red haired bobcat or Garfield. I also have to consider the eyewitness accounts of the other 3 or 4 people who describe the same thing. I admit the pic doesnt prove anything, but that animal has good sized front legs and paws and appears thicker than a bobcat. Also the neighbor and a friend describe the same thing including a long tail when they saw it in the same time period. So what about the print guys?
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#107 Trapper

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 06:59 AM

Yes, my bad I meant "non-scavenger" :rolleyes: , great info KPR.
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#108 hunting

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 07:09 AM

Wammer, as much as I am a believer, I truly am, the print is a bit small, it is less then three inches. Not saying it is not..just saying it is small.
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#109 KPR

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 07:23 AM

"So what about the print guys?"


She said the pic was taken in Dec.
The image data that is electronically stored in the picture...automatically... says it was taken in either Aug. or Sept.

What about that?
(Too bad her Sony wasn't a bit newer it might have GPS geo-tagging embedded in it.)
People have been known to replicate/fabricate things ;)


I've never heard DNR claim there is an 80% "chance" there are Cougars in NS.

What about that?

I've never heard about any cougar kills found in NS.
The info pasted above indicates they are VERY differant/unique from any other type kills.
They gotta eat...right?

What about that?

If they are here and they gotta eat then they have poop too...no-one has produced a scat pile.

What about that?

No-one has ever gotten a descernable pic of one in NS. trailcam or handheld cam.
No-one has ever killed or trapped one in NS.

*EDIT in*....No-one has ever treed one with hounds in NS

What about that?
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#110 KPR

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 07:30 AM

Yes, my bad I meant "non-scavenger" :rolleyes: , great info KPR.


Hmmm well I kinda wondered but there was great info in the copy/paste.
I would "think" what it has about kills and the differances compared to coyotes it would make even more of a case against the possibility of cougars here.
I suspect...means I'm guessin...

"Cougars kill calves much like they do sheep and goats. Multiple kills of sheep and goats by cougars are common; cases of a hundred or more animals killed in a single incident have been recorded. As a rule, very few animals, often only one or two in such incidents, are fed upon by the cougar."

If something like that or anywhere near that happened in NS we'd see it on Live at 5 at the very least.
Then I'd believe.
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#111 hunter

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 12:49 PM

Tough crowd in here wammer :D :lol: :blink: ;)


I've been on private property when a cougar was shot in Kings County by an ex-swamps and bogs employee....
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#112 Ghostbear

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 06:21 PM

wammer,I am apt to beleive that there are cougars in N.S. A long time ago ( back in the 1970's), a man named John Hebb saw one on his property early one morning in a field on the William Hebb Road which is just outside of Bridgewater. He told me that the night before there were men in the field who were bailing hay. At just about dark they finished and turrned their equipment off. When there did they heard an awful screaming sound coming from close by in the woods. John told me that the cougar was a tawny grey. He also made some plater paris casts of the tracks, of which I have one. I willtry to remember to bring it next weekend to the bear day. He was at one time the headmaster at the Kings Hill Academy and used to travel the Chester/Windsor highway alot. On his many trips through there he saw two cougars on different occasions,one of them he told me was almost jet black. He is no longer with us but I no he would not lie about any of this.
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#113 Halftail

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 07:45 PM

Pictures look similar to my Deer cam pics of a Bobcat from a couple of years ago.
Posted Image
Posted Image
Cat showed up a couple of hours after this skinny Doe...
Posted Image
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#114 Buckster

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 06:49 AM

Question: Is it against the law to shoot one if they don`t exist? (if a tree falls in the forest does it make a noise?)
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#115 Huntwisely

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 07:02 AM

Yep, it is - just like the domestic wild turkeys folks have been releasing. There is no season for them, and they aren't listed as other harvestable wildlife, or as a furbearer. They way the law works is that if it doesn't say you can, then it becomes "you can't".
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#116 Coupester

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 04:15 PM

However, if you read the Hunting Regulations under "Furharvesting - Seasons and Bag Limits" it does list cougar as close season.

See page 28:
"Lynx, Marten, Cougar and Fisher
CLOSED SEASON.
Accidentally caught animals must be released or reported
immediately to a DNR office, except one (1) fisher may be kept
if taken accidentally in a trap lawfully set for another species.
Fisher carcasses must be turned in and pelts stamped
at the appropriate DNR office. (See Biological
Specimens To Be Turned In, page 37)."
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#117 hunting

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 04:24 PM

However, if you read the Hunting Regulations under "Furharvesting - Seasons and Bag Limits" it does list cougar as close season.

See page 28:
"Lynx, Marten, Cougar and Fisher
CLOSED SEASON.
Accidentally caught animals must be released or reported
immediately to a DNR office, except one (1) fisher may be kept
if taken accidentally in a trap lawfully set for another species.
Fisher carcasses must be turned in and pelts stamped
at the appropriate DNR office. (See Biological
Specimens To Be Turned In, page 37)."

Yup Some Folks have seemed to have miss that little tidbit
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#118 KPR

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 06:25 PM

I'm sure if someone caught a cougar they would want to know "immediately" same as with any other strange or rare/non existant critter but I think that may be more geared twds domestic animals.(just a guess)
Just because you can't harvest it doesn't mean they don't want to gather all management info available to them.
Saves them time and money if we do most of it for them,plus we benefit also.
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#119 heavyweight

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 09:10 PM

Oh this debate rolls on must be the time of year,too close to hunting time once again.This debate will continue until some hunter or such plops down a cougar that either gets hit by a car ,shot by a hunter or irreputable evidence such as a photograph with confirmed location and times.then it will be probably deemed an illeagal release or escape.as for trail pics I ve had every known animal in the woods traveling down the deer trails I put cams on,but no cougars yet!And truthfully I hope i don t ever get one,the last thing we need in our woods is a breeding population of cougars who can t satisfy their appetites with moles ,mice ,rabbits or the odd deer,as these beasts are reported to have to take down lg game such as deer atleast once a week.
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#120 DuckerDan

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 09:15 PM

Look at this guy one of his toes could cover that track ;)

This is the cat at the Oaklawn farm zoo :)

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