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New Coyote-Wolf Hybrid Takes Hold In Maine


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#1 Wendell

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 05:06 PM

Historically, the coyote was the wolf's prey. However, by 1919, the wolf viewed the smaller canid differently and the two began to mate. This happened in Canada and around the Great Lakes. The result was hybridization. The crossing of these animals produced the coyote that we see in Maine today. Originally thought to be the Western coyote, this new hybrid is perfectly adapted to Maine. "It's a bigger animal," said Dr. Paula T. Work of the Maine State Museum.  "It has a bushy tail, it's a taller animal and it's about twice the weight of the Western coyote."

http://www.wcsh6.com/mb/entertainment/television/bill-greens-maine/new-wolf-hybrid-takes-old-in-maine/430178289


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#2 3macs1

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Posted 16 April 2017 - 06:55 PM

Thanks for sharing

 

Welcome to our world I say. We have never had anything but the larger ones even back in the 80's when they first started to show up here

 

Cheers


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#3 Wendell

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 03:58 PM

Maine’s coyotes are destined to become a bigger, bolder, more aggressive wolf-like animal, and in time will pose an even greater threat to the state’s white-tailed deer population. The Eastern coyote has long been recognized by state biologists as a coyote-wolf hybrid, first documented in Maine in the early 1900s. But Roland Kays, a leading researcher of coyote DNA at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, said the Eastern coyote found in Maine is becoming more “wolfy” as natural selection favors the dominant wolf genes that make it a larger, more effective predator than its Western counterpart. “They will continue to get bigger,” Kays said. “They have more wolf genes than the Western coyote. From an evolution point of view, it’s helping the animal survive better. Those (wolf) genes that make it larger are being passed on. I see no reason that will change.”

http://www.pressherald.com/2017/05/07/my-what-big-skulls-maine-coyotes-have/


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#4 KC1751

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 06:59 AM

Wendall thanks for sharing 

imagine NS coywolves can take down moose

In Maine hunters and trappers can hunt coywolves year round

we do nothing like that here in Nova Scotia; DNR barely acknowledges the detrimental effect these creatures have on our wildlife and pets

they are deer killing machines


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#5 3macs1

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 07:10 AM

Wendall thanks for sharing 

imagine NS coywolves can take down moose

In Maine hunters and trappers can hunt coywolves year round

we do nothing like that here in Nova Scotia; DNR barely acknowledges the detrimental effect these creatures have on our wildlife and pets

they are deer killing machines

They have here for sure. I remember seeing some video a dude on a snowmobile took in the highlands about 6 or 8 of them took out a cow after a very very long battle in the deep snow

 Cheers


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#6 nomad

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 10:20 AM

I read an indepth article on them that said whitetail deer make up more than 60% of the eastern coyotes diet. It also said, deer numbers have declined substantially everywhere the eastern coyote has gained a foothold.
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I am a gun enthusiast. In fact, I guess you could call me one of the "nutz". Don't like it? Too f#%<in bad!!!

#7 greybeard

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 01:15 PM

Thanks for sharing.

First one I ever saw was 1983,if I remember correctly, Black River, Pictou County, it surprised me how big it was as I was still hunting for deer.


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Insanity/Hunting...doing the same thing over and over again hoping for a different outcome.

#8 gary

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 06:06 PM

Newfoundland is dealing with some big dogs too.


http://www.cbc.ca/ne...twood-1.3959576


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#9 beaverhunter

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 06:48 PM

Newfoundland is dealing with some big dogs too.


http://www.cbc.ca/ne...twood-1.3959576

 

They have pure wolves crossing too into NFLD from Labrador.

 

An interesting podcast, Joe Rogan interviews Justin Brown a coyote expert, they talk about Cape Breton yotes and the incident at 51 min mark

 


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mqdefault.jpgab072989328f3b31f3b5865afa43dd74.jpg

I remember watching bambi for the first time when I was little and my favourite part
was when they killed bambi's mother because I knew somwhere the hunters
family was eating good that night never understood why they made him out to be the
bad guy.

We are advised to NOT judge ALL Muslims by the actions of a few lunatics, but We are encouraged to judge ALL gun owners by the actions of a few lunatics. Funny how that works.

Gotta Love The Nova Scotia Federation of Anti Hunters

#10 linnie

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Posted 11 May 2017 - 08:40 PM

They have pure wolves crossing too into NFLD from Labrador.

 

An interesting podcast, Joe Rogan interviews Justin Brown a coyote expert, they talk about Cape Breton yotes and the incident at 51 min mark

 

Thanks for sharing beaverhunter!!

I've only watched a few minutes here and there but sounds pretty interesting.


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Don't bite the hand that feeds you


#11 gary

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 06:52 PM

interesting that buddy was helping out the Cape Breton study on coyotes for a while.

He mentioned how car smart some of them are in Chicago & LA - sorta like around here IMO. You don't see many of them re roadkill. Or even their eyes caught in the headlights.

Thanks for posting this up.


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#12 ttc

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 11:13 AM

Gene and his trapping buddy Roddie snared this in a fox set on their trap line. At that time game warden Buddy MacIntyre wasn't sure what is was , so it was sent to a lab in Charlottetown and confirmed to be wild. It was said to be one of the first coyotes caught on PEI.

 

first%20coyote_1.jpg


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#13 3macs1

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 11:22 AM

Gene and his trapping buddy Roddie snared this in a fox set on their trap line. At that time game warden Buddy MacIntyre wasn't sure what is was , so it was sent to a lab in Charlottetown and confirmed to be wild. It was said to be one of the first coyotes caught on PEI.

 

first%20coyote_1.jpg

Wonder what year that was. I know we had one attack our decoys in 87 in the lot 16 area

Cheers


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#14 ttc

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 02:12 PM

think the provincial site says 83 but the person i nabbed it from thought the picture was from 87. either way i would of only been playing with cap guns back then.


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#15 3macs1

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 04:58 PM

think the provincial site says 83 but the person i nabbed it from thought the picture was from 87. either way i would of only been playing with cap guns back then.

Thanks. I was just curious

 Cheers


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